Growing Wolf Population Not Easy for Livestock Owners
 
"...the Wisconsin Department of Natural Resources Board [DNR] was told last week that at least 70 percent of livestock kills are due to problem wolves. The DNR says [that] it's proud of the wolf recovery program that has led to there being more than 300 grey wolves in Wisconsin..." Dear reader, what's wrong with this picture? If DNR employees were elected, there'd be a different scenario in Wisconsin for SURE!
 
 
December 13, 2004
 
Wisconsin Ag Connection
 
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The past year hasn't been any easier for state livestock producers, whose cattle are continuing to become more vulnerable to wolf depredation.
 
According to the USDA's Wildlife Service, another 27 wolves have been captured and killed in Wisconsin during 2004 -- seven more than the year earlier.
 
Officials say relocating problem wolves did not stop younger wolves from learning how to kill livestock.
 
Dave Nelson, head of the Wildlife Services office in Wisconsin and Minnesota, says removing the problem wolves affects the tendency of wolves to kill livestock and also enhances the tolerance for the wolves.
 
Meanwhile, the Wisconsin Department of Natural Resources Board was told last week that at least 70 percent of livestock kills are due to problem wolves.
 
The DNR says it's proud of the wolf recovery program that has led to there being more than 300 grey wolves in Wisconsin.
 
But landowner complaints have also risen.
 
During the past several years, state and federal authorities have been considering the possibility of taking the wolf off of the endangered species list.
 
Copyright 2004, Wisconsin Ag Connection.
 
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